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FAQ

Dental clinic FAQs for La Crosse

 La Crosse Pediatric Dentistry LLC is happy to answer your questions, so we provide a few common questions and answers right here. If you have other questions, don't hesitate to give us a call and speak to our staff.

What do I need to know about scheduling appointments?

Our staff attempts to schedule appointments at your convenience. We want positive visits every time. Thus, we offer morning appointments to children five years of age and younger. Years of experience have shown us that our younger friends are refreshed and ready to work with us at an earlier time.

Since appointment times are reserved exclusively for each patient, we ask that you notify our office 48 business hours in advance of your scheduled appointment time if you are unable to keep our appointment. We realize that unexpected things can happen, but we ask for your assistance in this regard.

What about finances or our payment & insurance policies?

We will bill insurance. We collect our estimated portion at the time of service. 6 months interest free financing is available with care credit. We also accept cash, check, Visa, Master Card, and Discover.

Preferred Insurance Plans
  • Delta Dental of WI (Preferred and Premier Plans)
  • Health Traditions
  • Careington
  • Aetna
  • Cigna
  • United Concordia
  • Met Life/ TriCare

Do I stay with my child during the visit?

You are welcome to accompany your child during their visit. We understand that going to the dentist can make little children nervous when they do not know what to expect. We are highly experienced in helping children overcome anxiety. Our goal is to make them feel comfortable and even enjoy their dental appointment.

When should I start scheduling for my child?

The American Dental Association recommends meeting children and their families before their first birthday for a "Happy Visit". It gives us the opportunity to visit before kids have dental problems. We will discuss oral hygiene, how to brush teeth/gums, teething tips, and use of bottles, pacifiers, and sippy cups.

What is a pediatric dentist?

Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and limits his/her practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs.

Cleaning my babies teeth

A toothbrush will remove plaque bacteria that can lead to decay. Any soft-bristled toothbrush with a small head, preferably one designed specifically for infants, should be used twice a day, in the morning and, most importantly, at bedtime.

Nursing

Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bed-time bottle. Also, learn the proper way to brush and floss your child's teeth. Take your child to a pediatric dentist regularly to have his/her teeth and gums checked. The first dental visit should be scheduled by your child's first birthday.

The importance of baby teeth

Primary, or "baby," teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt. If they are not cared of properly they can develop decay and infection, which can lead to pain and problems eating.

What is a pediatric dentist?

Pediatric dentists are the pediatricians of dentistry. A pediatric dentist has two to three years specialty training following dental school and limits his/her practice to treating children only. Pediatric dentists are primary and specialty oral care providers for infants and children through adolescence, including those with special health needs.

Cleaning my babies teeth

A toothbrush will remove plaque bacteria that can lead to decay. Any soft-bristled toothbrush with a small head, preferably one designed specifically for infants, should be used twice a day, in the morning and, most importantly, at bedtime.

Thumbsucking and pacifiers

Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers past the age of three this can lead to changes in your child’s bite and tooth position.

When to take my child in for a check up

In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when the first tooth appears, or no later than his/her first birthday. A check-up every six months is recommended in order to prevent cavities and other dental problems. Always ask your pediatric dentist for his recommendation.

Toothaches

If your child has a toothache rinse the irritated area with warm salt water and place a cold compress on the face if it is swollen. Give the child over-the-counter children’s pain medication (use as directed), rather than placing aspirin on the teeth or gums. See a dentist as soon as possible.

Stainless steel crowns and pulpotomy

A pulpotomy is a procedure that requires the removal of part of the nerve tissue that has been infected. After removal, stainless steel crowns are prefabricated and are adapted to fit individual teeth. The crown will last the life of the primary tooth, and the patient will not have to undergo repeated restorations on the same tooth.

Toothpastes

Any brand of toothpaste is fine, as long as it has fluoride. Parents should use a tiny smear of fluoride toothpaste on a soft, age-appropriate sized toothbrush to brush baby teeth twice daily as soon as the teeth erupt. Once children are 3 to 6 years old, then the amount should be increased to a pea-size amount. It is important to assist with your child’s toothbrushing.

Healthy diet, healthy teeth

Make sure your child has a balanced diet. Limiting the servings of sugars and starches will also aid in protecting your child's teeth from decay. You can also ask your pediatric dentist to help you select foods that protect your children's teeth. Foods that contain sugar and are sticky/chewy can get stuck between you child’s teeth and are especially harmful (candy, fruit snacks, raisins, granola bars, etc.).

Sealants

A sealant is a protective coating that is applied to the chewing surfaces (grooves) of the back teeth, where four out of five cavities in children are found. This easy-to-apply sealant acts as a barrier to food, plaque and acid, thus protecting the decay-prone areas of the teeth for years.

Fluoride

Have your pediatric dentist evaluate the fluoride level of your child's primary source of drinking water. If your child is not getting enough fluoride internally through water (especially if the fluoride level is deficient or if your child drinks bottled water without fluoride), then your pediatric dentist may prescribe fluoride supplements.

Keeping teeth safe in sports

Soft plastic mouthguards can be used to protect a child's teeth, lips, cheeks and gums from sport related injuries. A custom-fitted mouthguard developed by a pediatric dentist will protect your child from injuries to the teeth, face and even provide protection from severe injuries to the head.

Broken tooth

The most important thing to do when a tooth breaks is to calmly find the tooth, clean it in water, and take your child to the dentist immediately with the tooth in cold milk. The sooner the tooth is treated the better the outcome.

X-rays

Radiographs (X-Rays) are a vital and necessary part of your child’s dental diagnostic process. Without them, certain dental conditions can and will be missed. Pediatric dentists are especially careful to limit the amount of radiation to which children are exposed. Lead aprons and high-speed film are used to ensure safety and minimize the amount of radiation.

Tooth decay and restoration

Plaque, a sticky film of bacteria, constantly forms on your teeth. When you eat or drink foods containing sugars, the bacteria in plaque produce acids that attack tooth enamel. This is when cavities can form. If not treated, it can grow into the deeper layers of the tooth, but you can avoid cavities by brushing, flossing, and regularly taking your child to see the dentist. Composite restorations (white fillings) are used for primary and permanent teeth after the removal of tooth decay.

Sedation and Nitrous Oxide

We offer various levels of sedation to help your child receive dental treatment. For example, Nitrous Oxide (laughing gas) is used to alleviate mild anxiety associated with dental treatment. These options will be reviewed with the parent and a plan will be put in place. Providing excellent dental work and keeping your child's fear and anxiety as low as possible is our goal. 

Nitrous Oxide

Nitrous oxide has been used in dental care for many decades. This gas works quickly on the human body and it only takes a few breaths for your child to start to feel relaxed. Once the flow of nitrous is removed, your child will return to normal within a few minutes. Your child will be able to go to school immediately after the appointment.
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